Spotlight

Our fourth issue draws attention to the ways in which race – specifically Blackness – is chartered and codified across different geospatial terrains. In our lead feature, writer Lindokuhle Nkosi draws on Zora Neale Hurston’s famous 1928 essay “How It Feels to Be Colored Me” to reflect on the Season 2 finale of our podcast Race Beyond Borders. Her essay brings into sharp focus the many ways geography impacts the experience of Blackness. Musicologist Willemien Froneman from the Africa Open Institute at Stellenbosch University introduces us to Refentse Morake, South Africa's first Black boeremusiek icon, to invite a deeper, more critical, understanding of musical interracialism. Specifically, Froneman argues that while music is often portrayed as a great unifier, in fact, an examination and deconstruction of the patterns of power underlying its cultural production yields a different reality. Our fourth issue draws attention to the ways in which race – specifically Blackness – is chartered and codified across different geospatial terrains. In our lead feature, writer Lindokuhle Nkosi draws on Zora Neale Hurston’s famous 1928 essay “How It Feels to Be Colored Me” to reflect on the Season 2 finale Read More...

Features

Proximal Blackness

Lindokuhle Nkosi

Beyond a hollow account of musical interracialism

Willemien Froneman

Art

Entrance to the Garden (2021)

M. Florine Démosthène

Preto Blindado (2021)

Ederson Pereira dos Santos

Podcast

Proximal Blackness: Season 2 Finale

Sebabatso C. Manoeli

The Three Most Popular Episodes from Season 2

The Good People at Between Productions

Contributors

Atlantic Fellow for Racial Equality
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