Insight

The second issue of Moya engages one of the lively debates of our time: can identity politics liberate the oppressed? By employing an explicitly transnational lens, Danielle Bowler has gone to the source of the term identity politics. Coined by the members of the Combahee River Collective in the early 1970s, the concept represented a radical approach to making sense of interlocking oppressions. Since then, the term has become hotly contested across the political spectrum, and its meanings and political applications remain often obscured. Bowler’s piece offers both an understanding of Barbara Smith’s original intentions and her reflections on the current life of this idea in the world. The second issue of Moya engages one of the lively debates of our time: can identity politics liberate the oppressed? By employing an explicitly transnational lens, Danielle Bowler has gone to the source of the term identity politics. Coined by the members of the Combahee River Collective in the early 1970s, Read More...

Features

Identity Politics: Returning to the Source

Danielle Bowler

Art

I am Orisha (2021)

Blaine D. Teamer

Finding Comfort in Darkness (2021)

Siyolisi Bani

baby oku (2021)

REWA

Supper (2020)

Lorryn Moore

Podcast

Colombia’s Politics of Blackness

Ana María González-Forero Manuel Gutiérrez

Iran: “Blackness is a Surprise”

Priscillia Kounkou Hoveyda

Events

Video: Black Futures

Contributors

Atlantic Fellow for Racial Equality
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